Image description

Westlock County

Redwater Bridge to Echo Lake

An off-road section of trail between Redwater River Bridge 246 and the new Echo Lake campground was completed in 2016 and includes fencing, trail building and Athabasca Landing Trail signage. Interpretive signs and lobsticks will be put up in 2017 and will give insight into the Aboriginal, Metis and European history in this region. Rainbow Equitation Society and Westlock County led the planning and development of this section of trail.

Redwater Bridge 246

Redwater Bridge 246

Redwater Bridge 246 near Half Moon Lake is a key link in the historic Athabasca Landing Trail, a non-motorized recreational trail that will go from Fort Saskatchewan north to Athabasca. The new access-controlled, single lane bridge will also accommodate light local motor vehicle traffic.

The Athabasca Landing Trail was an important transportation route in the late 1800s. Built by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1876, the trail brought fur traders, gold miners, settlers and others to Alberta's northern regions.

The design of the new Redwater Bridge (horizontal image above) replicates the original wooden bridge built in 1905. The 1912 blue steel bridge that replaced the original structure served the region for many years, but was closed to traffic due to safety concerns in 2001. The steel bridge was moved onto a nearby field and replaced by the new bridge, built by a combination of hired contractors and volunteers.

The project was led by the Athabasca Recreational Trails Association, and was made possible with grants from the Government of Canada, Government of Alberta, Westlock County, Trans Canada Trail and Alberta TrailNet Society. Signage and maintenance of the bridge are provided by Westlock County.


Redwater Bridge 246 Interpretive Sign



View Sign


Redwater Bridge 246




















Directions To Redwater Bridge 246

1 Head north on 97 Street NW - 4.8km

2 Continue onto Highway AB - 28 North - 26.8km

3 Turn left at AB - 803 North 13.6km - (signs for Legal, AB)

4 Turn right at AB - 651 East - 6.5km

5 Turn left at AB - 651 East /Range Road 235 North - 12.9km

6 Turn left at Township Road 590 - 190m

7 Take the 1st right onto Range Road 234 - 750m - Look for Hall on Right side of road

8 Continue onto Range Road 234A - 300m

9 Follow 234A to find bridge

History of Redwater Bridge 246

Redwater Bridge is located on the Athabasca Landing Trail at Range Road 234 over the Redwater River. The Redwater Bridge is a key link in the historic Athabasca Landing Trail, a non-motorized recreational trail that will go from Fort Saskatchewan north to Athabasca. The new access-controlled, single lane bridge will also accommodate light local motor vehicle traffic.

The original structure spanning the Redwater River was a 15.2 metre long wooden truss that was constructed in 1905. A steel bridge crossing was constructed in 1912 and consisted of an 18.3 m pony truss with 6.1 m treated timber approach spans.

Construction of a new multi-purpose bridge over the Redwater River started on February 25, 2010 and was completed on March 31. The bridge project was spearheaded by the Athabasca Recreational Trails Association. Construction of the $292,000 bridge was made possible with grants from the federal and provincial governments ($20,000 from the Alberta government), Westlock County, Trans Canada Trail and Alberta TrailNet Society.

The bridge design mimics the original historic wooden bridge built in 1905 to transport people and goods along the Athabasca Landing Trail, an important transportation route in Alberta's early history. The Athabasca Landing Trail was an important transportation route in the late 1800s. Communities situated near or along the trail include Athabasca, Bon Accord, Clyde, Colinton, Fedorah, Fort Saskatchewan, Gibbons, Lamoureux, Meanook, Nestow, Perryvale, Rochester, Tawatinaw, Waugh and Westlock.

The obsolete bridge was moved onto adjacent farmland and will be converted into a trailhead and interpretive site in the future. It will be one of several landmarks along the Athabasca Landing Trail.

News release: Redwater Bridge Opening